in a jar + memory jar craft

In A Jar by Deborah Marcero (2020).

This picture book has illustrations that are pure magic while the story is about the magic of the natural world, of friendship, and of memories—those we treasure and those we share.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(click image(s) to enlarge)

 

“Llewellyn was a collector. He collected things in jars.”

So simply starts In a Jar. We take in Llewellyn collecting all kinds of things from the world around them and cherishing them, remembering the moments they contained, and still do.

 

 

 

Then Llewellyn and Evelyn meet. They collect things—together. But they’re not things really, they’re snippets, souvenirs, strands of their experiences. And that’s where the magic comes in. Sunsets, the sound of the ocean, snowball fights, seasons. These are the things they collect in jars. It feels like they’re not owning these elements, but honoring them.

Their jars are the language of their friendship, the stuff of it. The bits they’ll keep in the vessels of their minds.

And when Evelyn needs to move away, there is pain, but there is also the joy of sharing new experiences, had separately, and letting friendship hold those too.

Deborah Macero‘s artwork shimmers with color and light, sketched lines and watercolor swishes. She has a special knack for skies, as evidenced in another picture book of hers, Ursa’s Light, and its celestial scenes.


A book for anyone yearning to hang on to moments, to savor and cherish them, and for anyone who loves someone who is separated by the distance of miles, but connected by memories—even new ones still traded and shared.

 

 

Big thanks to Penguin Young Readers for the review copy and images!

 

+

Don’t you want to collect your own memories in a jar now? Rebecca Zarazan Dunn from Sturdy for Common Things is the ideal person to make a craft for this book because she is someone with a special way of capturing moments, memories, and seasons in her own life. She’s a former librarian, a maker, a reader, and from what I’ve observed, has a deep connection with nature and people.

Over to Rebecca! 

 

 

In a Jar is a tenderhearted tribute to friendship and the power of shared experience. 

What I found moving about Llewellyn and Evelyn’s story is how the two friends collected their shared experiences. They savored sights and sounds and adventures, bottling them up like prized trophies. I thought to myself how wonderful it would be to capture long shadows on a summer’s eve or a snowy day with a friend. 

 

 

Recently, two young siblings had an eventful Saturday. From early on it felt special, so as the day unfolded they collected bits and pieces of their day into a mason jar. For moments they didn’t have objects for they wrote a note or drew a picture. Once all the memories were captured in the jar, they made it a label and placed the jar on a shelf– A not-too-high shelf so they can unscrew the jar and recall the day all over again any time they pleased. 

 

 

 

Just like friendship or adventures of any sort, you don’t need much to have them. It’s the same with making a Memory Jar.

Here’s what you’ll need:

*A jar. Any old jar. We reused a mason jar. I also found a few more jars at our local thrift store.

*Paper, scissors, tape, and a writing utensil for labeling the jar. 

*And most importantly, memories! Little objects or tokens or drawings or words that will remind you of the moment. 

 

 


A memory jar is a time capsule of an hour, a day, an event, or an entire season. It can be a play date with a friend, a holiday, a new life experience, or a Saturday spent with family. You can make one alone, but like Llewellyn learns in the story, the best memories are made with someone dear to you. 

 

 

Memory is a funny thing. We store so much information in our brains and beautifully small details often get pushed into a dark corner. Creating a memory jar has the potential of time-travel, resurrecting a once shadowed memory to the light. Time spent with those we love is ephemeral, and capturing these fleeting moments in a jar preserves the love and joy felt, especially if the person we shared it with isn’t always near. 

 

If you enjoy wrangling adventures into jars, you will most likely enjoy other things on Rebecca’s blog Sturdy for Common Things. You can also follow her on Instagram @lovesreading

 

Thank you, Rebecca, for sharing this meaningful craft and your reflections on the book and on memories with us!

 

You might like the post I collaborated on with Kellie at The Secret Society of Books on a few years ago. She made the loveliest bear cookies for Deborah Marcero’s book, Ursa’s Light!

 

 

 

 

 

9 Responses to in a jar + memory jar craft

  1. Andrea Mack says:

    I really want to read this one. And I LOVE the idea of memories in a jar! What a great project! Thanks for featuring this book.

  2. Kathy Halsey says:

    Everything about this post, book, and craft idea is enchanting. TY.

  3. Gabi Snyder says:

    I love the sound of this one, and those illustrations are dreamy. Can’t wait to try the craft idea with my daughter. Thanks for sharing, Danielle!

  4. Cathy Ogren says:

    Love this!

Talk to me!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.