Author Archives: readswritesrollerskates

back to school with to make!

It’s back to school, and this time around I’ve got a new book to share!

 

That’s where author visits come in! One of my favorite things is spending time with children while helping them tap into their unique voices and imaginations, inspiring them to read, write, create, and make! You’ll find all the info about my offerings in one place right here.

If you’re part of a school or library community, I hope you’ll get in touch if you’d like to arrange one!

 

And whether or not I visit your students, I have something special to share with you for the school year ahead! 

 

(Photo by Jenna Rothberg.)

 

Jenna Rothberg, PhD (KidlitBrain) and JD Smithson, MLIS created “Everyone is a Maker”: A Classroom and Library Companion Guide for To Make! You can download it in either color or black and white for easy printing too!

 

This treasure of a curriculum guide is meant to support teachers, librarians, and caregivers as you support the makers in your classrooms, libraries, and homes too. A resource that’s a myriad of making and TO MAKE resources all in one place, like an online community booklist for us all to create together and so much else for children to make: conversation, games, a change with their community, a plant press, an invitation, and at its heart and throughout, a maker’s journal where every child can reflect on, record, and reinvigorate their identity and process as maker through each creative endeavor.

So much gratitude to the two makers who poured their hearts and talents into this to make a gift for educators to use and witness little makers grow and bloom. And it is certainly a gift for me as well.

 

Wishing every educator everything they need for the year ahead, with much appreciation for making a difference!

 

 

 

this picture book life turns 9

For This Picture Book Life’s 9th anniversary, I’m giving away two bundles of new, some summery and some fall-feeling, picture books with this theme: people and places. Summer adventures, special relatives, trips, swimming, biographies, first days of school, belonging, identity, siblings, pizza, and more!

 

 

The giveaway for Bundle One will be right here! (Rafflecopter below.)

The one for Bundle Two will be on Instagram—here instead!

 

 

The First Bundle:

Climb on! Illustrated by Jacqueline Alcántara, written by Baptiste Paul (2022).

Ready for the Spotlight! by Jaime Kim (2022).

Clementine and the Lion by Zoey Abbott (2022).

I’ll Go and Come Back by Rajani LaRocca, illustrated by Sara Palacios (2022).

Black Girl Rising by Brynne Barnes, illustrations by Tatyana Fazlalizadeh (2022).

Pizza: A Slice of History by Greg Pizzoli (2022).

The Fossil Whisperer by Helaine Becker and Sandra Dumais (2022).

This is a School words by John Schu, illustrations by Veronica Miller Jamison (2022).

 

The Second Bundle:

The Big Bath House by Kyo Maclear & Gracey Zhang (2021).

My Town Mi Pueblo by Nicholas Solis, illustrated by Luisa Uribe (2022).

A Mermaid Girl by Sana Rafi, illustrated by Olivia Aserr (2022).

The Queen of Kindergarten by Derrick Barnes and Vanessa Brantley-Newton (2022).

Cycle City by Alison Farrell (2018).

Everything in Its Place: A Story of Books and Belonging by Pauline David-Sax, illustrated by Charnel Pinkney Barlow (2022).

Strong written by Rob Kearney & Eric Rosewood, illustrated by Nidhi Chanani (2022).

One Boy Watching by Grant Snider (2022).

 

Okay, enter to win below for the first bundle or on IG for the second! And many thanks for following along with This Picture Book Life.

 

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

to make is out + book trailer!

To Make, with art by Mags DeRoma is out today!

 

 

 

I’m filled with joy to be able to share our book with you and with children, all of whom are makers too!


It inspires and is an ode to the creative process with these steps:

gather, make, wait.


Those building blocks of making have meant so much to me and my own process, and this book reflects a lot of making and fifteen years specifically of my own work making picture book manuscripts. So today is the birthday of the first one of those to be an actual book! Honestly, and thankfully, the timing feels exactly right. My hope is that the story helps kid readers believe that they, too, have all the reason in the world to “keep making.” That is its heart and why I wrote it in the first place.

 

 

 

 

And the biggest thanks to illustrator Mags DeRoma
for going on this journey with me
and for stunning, scrumptious, story-rich illustrations!

And to the most stellar editor, Mabel Hsu at Katherine Tegen/HarperCollins, Amy Ryan (art director), Molly Fehr (designer), and Hannah Mann who agented this project with courage and creativity.

As a way of celebrating, you’re invited to view this special
stop animation book trailer.
My partner and I collaborated on a concept and then he and a truly stellar, caring crew brought it to life. I am forever grateful.

 

 

 

 

We hope the To Make book trailer inspires you and the children in your life
to start creating!

 

 

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You’re invited to our virtual book launch at truly wonderful Brave + Kind Bookshop
on June 7th!
Register for free right here!

You can get a copy of the book from Brave + Kind too.

Or your favorite indie bookstore.

You could also check it out from your local library instead! That’s just as wonderful! Or request it if they don’t have a copy—libraries for the win!

If you enjoy To Make and are able to leave a review
on Goodreads or elsewhere online, that’s super helpful to creators of books as well.

Thank you, thank you for your support! To celebrating, and to MAKING!

 

 

16 creativity-packed picture books

I give you 16 creativity-packed picture books that inspire me.  I’ve chosen them specifically from my own life as a writer because they have spoken to me, either years ago or else become recent favorites. I hope you’ll add one of your favorite picture books on the topic in the comments!

Here’s to creativity and the picture books that inspire more of it!

 

Show the World! written by Angela Dalton illustrated by Daria Peoples (2022).

Picked because it’s super packed with self-expression of all different kinds and centers Black children shining as they show the world what they love and do.

 

Off-Limits by Helen Yoon (2021).

Picked because this new favorite playfully shows us that following our curiosity, breaking the rules, and getting messy are part of any artistic process. Plus, Mayel Creates made a wonderful office supply garland craft to match it!

 

 

Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat by Javaka Steptoe (2016).

Picked because this Basquiat picture book biography is incredible and captures not only his story, but how his story exemplifies that art is infused in place and culture. “Art is the street games of little children, in our style and the words that we speak. It is how the messy patchwork of the city creates new meaning for ordinary things.”

 

 

Lines by Suzy Lee (2017).

Picked because this is one of my favorite books about creativity, and I’ve never posted it on  my blog! Wordless and meta too, it’s filled with joy, surprise, and creative camaraderie.

 

 

Studio by Emily Arrow and The Little Friends of Printmaking (2019).

Picked because it’s an ode to being you and finding your singular expression and space to cultivate it before sharing that with the world. It’s exuberant, and I’ll also disclose: dedicated to me by Emily Arrow! It’s a special book and that detail makes it incredibly special on my personal bookshelf as well.

 

 

WallPaper by Thao Lam (2019).

Picked because I love all of Thao Lam‘s work, and this wordless because contains a whole world that imagination makes possible. A world in which a shy girl gains just the courage she needs through her own creativity and resourcefulness. Plus, I made a corresponding fun paper creature craft for it a couple of years back!

 

 

Little People, Big Dreams: Louise Bourgeois written by Maria Isabel Sánchez Vegara illustrated by Helena Pérez García (2020).

Picked because Louise Bourgeois is one of my very favorite non-living artists and this is a handy little compendium of her inspiring life. A fond memory of mine is seeing her giant spider sculpture, “Maman,” in Tokyo a few years go. The meaning of it, for me, is very different than for her, but I found it powerful and haunting and moving. “By using art to confront her fears, little Louise became one of the most important artists of the twentieth century, and the grandmother of modern art.”

Cloth Lullaby: The Woven Life of Louise Bourgeois words by Amy Novensky pictures by Isabelle Arsenault (2016).

Picked because: more Louise Bourgeois and because it’s exquisite in depicting a life woven together with the threads of her childhood, her mother, their family tapestry business, Parisian fabrics, memory, and stitching itself.

 

 

Wonder Bear by Tao Nyeu (2008).

Picked because I’ve admired this wordless story and its art for a long time, and actually got to see Tao Nyeu‘s art show exhibit of this book back in the day. It’s about children who plant seeds that grow into something wildly magical—an embodiment of creativity.

 

 

Aaron Slater, Illustrator by Andrea Beaty illustrated by David Roberts (2021).

Picked because this team is truly brilliant and this story truly speaks to kids, especially those who are dyslexic (and because my partner downloaded the font the text was printed in because he’s dyslexic and an artist like Aaron Slater too).  “…beauty and kindness and loving and art lend courage to all with a welcoming heart.”

 

 

The Book of Mistakes by Corinna Luyken (2017).

Picked because this gorgeously illustrated book tells a poetic story of mistakes leading to magic, as they often do in the creative process.

 

 

The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires (2014).

Picked because it captures getting frustrated and getting fed up on a project, part of creativity too. And how often a walk (or any break) is just the thing to see things anew.

 

Also an Octopus by Maggie Tokuda-Hall illustrated by Benji Davies (2016).

Picked because the phrase “little bit of nothing” for what every story starts with is fantastic. And this book about storytelling is fantastic and fantastical and too.

 

 

Julia, Child words by Kyo Maclear pictures by Julie Morstad (2013).

Picked because this one (written by a favorite author, Kyo Maclear), is creative in its very concept: a fictional tale of a kitchen-loving child who bears some resemblance to Julia Child. It’s ingredients: friendship, slow-down, sweetness, wonder, and imagination. Oh and Coco Cakeland made chocolate almond cupcakes to celebrate it with me a few years back!

 

 

 

Field Trip to the Moon by John Hare (2019).

Picked because this one is tons of fun with crayons and creativity as a conduit to friendship–on the MOON!

 

What Do You Do With An Idea? by Kobi Yamada illustrated by Mae Besom (2014).

Picked because it’s a magical yet relatable allegory for having and nurturing an idea: curious and strange and wonderful.

 

 

You might want to check out TPBL craft posts on Off-Limits, Wallpaper, and Julia, Child, mentioned above!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kamal’s Kes + collage lotus flower craft

Kamal’s Kes by Baljinder Kaur (2021).

This picture book absolutely blooms, like the flower of the main character’s name and the ones that grace her comb, hair, and surroundings in the pages.

Kes (kay-s) in Panjabi means hair. And this story is about Kamal’s hair.

It blossoms with honesty about Kamal’s feelings about her hair, her difficult but ultimately welcoming feelings. It blossoms with a captivating blend of text and design. It blossoms with evocative artwork, with colors that reflect the earth and flowers. It blossoms with imagination. And it blossoms with a journey toward self-love that kids need to experience.

 

 

Like every offering from independent publisher, Saffron Press, it’s made with so much intentionality (and I know from being friends with the founder how much intentionality goes into everything Saffron Press does, truly). From Baljinder Kaur’s dedication (“For every being who inspires me to strive for better”) and lotus endpapers to the gorgeous cover’s mix of gloss and matte and FSC-assured paper to that wonderful journal page at the back, “A letter to mySelf” for kids to reflect and write on, Kamal’s Kes is imbued with care for books and for those who read them.

 

(click image(s) to enlarge)

 

Kid readers will recognize themselves in the story as they, too, either face or anticipate the prospect of growing up. Of changing. Of journeying into a different state from childhood and how jarring and painful that can be, especially when they don’t feel accepted for who they are as they change.

 

 

Once a source of pleasure and admiration, as it grows and appears elsewhere, Kamal’s hair becomes a sore spot. An unruly thing. A burden she wants to rid herself of because of “the stares” she receives. She begins to see herself in a distorted, disconnected way.

 

 

 

I love how Kamal’s portrayed as a monster, wild thing-esque. The portrayal reflects, to me, the way we feel when we’re lost in the suffering of rejection—from others, from ourselves. The middle of the book is a tumble of color and composition toward this next striking spread that puts us right there with Kamal in her desperation, her separation from herself, a painful place to be.

 

But Kamal is not there forever. She experiences hope. Acceptance. Self-love. The joy of being her.

 

 

 

 

“I am beautiful, Kamal whispered, and she dug her toes deeper into the earth, decorating herself with wisdom older than the sun.”

 

Kamal’s Kes is an incredibly joyful, hopeful, loving gift for children to embrace themselves and, like the earth and flowers, truly bloom.

 

 

Big thanks to Saffron Press for interior images!

 

 

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I’m so thrilled that Baljinder Kaur, the incredible artist and author-illustrator of Kamal’s Kes!!, is here to share a companion craft for this picture book. It was so kind of her to answer my approach with a yes to the idea of creating something! And that something is is fitting, meaningful, lovely. I hope you and yours will make one too.

 

Over to Baljinder!

 

The word Kamal also means lotus flower and has great spiritual significance in Sikh thought as a metaphor for an aspiring state of being. Just as the lotus floats and blooms amidst the murky waters, so can our being in the murkiness of our worlds. In this craft we’ll be making our own lotus flowers to celebrate Kamal’s own blooming in the story. These paper flowers can be used as decoration and serve as a reminder that we can all bloom and rise in our own unique and beautiful ways.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you, Baljinder, for this book and this wonderful companion craft!! 

Baljinder Kaur is an illustrator nestled in the middle of England, UK. She is passionate about the power of children’s books and their ability to transcend barriers and transform our social landscapes. She enjoys exploring through themes of the fantastical, the allegorical and the enchantingly ordinary. Her work often, and intimately reflects through the lens of a Panjabi and Sikh diaspora existence.

As a child of immigrants, she’s keen to share stories that help us to connect deeper; stories that celebrate our differences as well as our wonderfully interconnected nature.

Baljinder recently graduated with distinction from Cambridge School of Art with a Masters degree in Children’s Book Illustration. She was also awarded the 2022 CSACBI Illustration for Older Fiction Prize. Her work has been published by Penguin Random House, Saffron Press and Mighty Khalsa.

 

 

 

Follow Baljinder Kaur on Instagram.

And follow Saffron Press.