15 picture books for comfort


I’ve been thinking about creating this post since the spread of coronavirus and the changes it’s brought to our lives. By chance, many of the titles in a recent stack of books I received for review from publishers spoke specifically, I thought, to this theme of comfort in one way or another.

You’ll find here some brand new books and some forthcoming as well as a few from recent years—and one classic that rings true for me in any difficult season (and always).

My intent is that some of these titles bring comfort to kids (and to you). If you’re someone who is hunkering down right now, thank you for taking compassionate action for the greater good by keeping physical distance from others as an act of care. If your job outside your home is vital and necessitates being out, thank you for providing community services that we all rely on with the work you do.

Each of these books speaks to and offers comfort in one way or another, some in seriousness and sincerity and some through a rest from seriousness in favor of silliness.

Wishing you soothing, strength, health, hope, and picture books. 

 


When the Storm Comes written by Linda Ashman, illustrated by Taeeun Yoo (2020).

This one outlines what we do and what animals do when a storm comes—and readers can apply this to any kind of storm. We prepare, we hunker down, and then, when the storm passes, we go outside, we survey, we repair, we help those who need help. “What do you do when the storm has passed—when the sun comes out and it’s calm at last?”

 

 

A Stone Sat Still by Brendan Wenzel (2019).

This is about a stone that sits still and what that stone is to other animals in different lights or seasons or from different perspectives. It speaks to me of permanence and transience, of being of use to others, of being present to what is—now. “A stone sat still with the water, grass, and dirt and it was as it was where it was in the world.”

 

Like the Moon Loves the Sky by Hena Khan, illustrated by Saffa Khan (2020).

A beautiful picture book that contains a series of wishes for a child as they grow that are deep and kind and full of love, with artwork that warms every page with washes of moon-hues and sky-hues: oranges, golds, blues. From the author: “Every line, or wish, in the book is inspired by the Quran, the Muslim holy book, which offers guidelines on how to live a thoughtful and grounded life filled with fairness, charity, justice, and most of all, love.”

 

We’ve Got the Whole World in Our Hands by Rafael López (2018).

You’ll know the tune of this one! It’s been transformed slightly to be more about our roles in the world and captures the joy and connection and small moments we have with one another. These magical spreads will truly buoy your heart with hope!

 

Bedtime for Sweet Creatures, words by Nikki Grimes, pictures by Elizabeth Zunon (2020).

Sweet indeed! A clever mother enlists the help of imaginary animals to coax her child to sleep as the child embodies each one with playful abandon. Rich, patterned, collage illustrations; lyrical language; and a wonderful bedtime routine.

 

Lilah Tov Good Night by Ben Gundersheimer (Mister G) and Noar Lee Naggan (2020).

“Lilah Tov” is a Hebrew lullaby and this family embarking on a journey—one that has echoes of those taken by refugees—repeats those words to all the bits of nature and the world they pass on their way to toward a new home.

 

 

A Last Goodbye by Elin Kelsey, artwork by Soyeon Kim (2020).

Now I need to warn you that this one is about death, and it’s quite frank. It details the way animals say goodbye when one of them dies. The way animals grieve. And it tells us something about what we do when one of us dies. The way we grieve. It is beautiful. It is deep. It is real. And it is full of the comfort of being loved and then sent off with love before returning to the earth in a connected way when the time comes.

 


Over the Moon by James Proimos, illustrated by Zoey Abbott (2020).

A girl is adopted by wolves, raised by wolves, and then finds her own kind, but still returns to her ever-present and sometimes hilarious wolf-parents. It’s the embodiment of safety found when safety’s needed. A strange, beautiful, and funny fable with the most charming, spirited pastel illustrations.

 


 

Hat Tricks by Satoshi Kitamura (2020).

A rabbit is the magician with the hat in this one, and animal, magical surprises ensue!

 

 

I Can Be Anything by Shinsuke Yoshitake (2020).

This book is hilarious! It captures a creative kid and an exasperated parent during a guessing game of “What am I?” that is inventive and funny and relatable and kind of never-ending in the best way. Let the guessing begin!

 

 

You Hold Me Up by Monique Gray Smith and Danielle Daniel (2017).

This book embodies kindness, joy, and respect for others with engaging, tender, pink-cheeked illustrations. It came out of the author’s desire for “healing and Reconciliation” in response to the history of oppression of Indigenous people, particularly in regards to Residential Schools in Canada.

 

I Am Loved, poems by Nikki Giovanni, illustrated by Ashley Bryan (2018).

A collection of poems that exude love for oneself and for others.

 

‘Ohana Means Family by Ilima Loomis, illustrated by Kenard Pak (2020).

A stunning book that follows the journey of poi being made, from farming to family and community coming together for a lū’au. An uplifting ode to kale or taro and to its centrality in Hawaiian culture and life.

 

 

Kaia and the Bees by Maribeth Boelts, illustrated by Angela  Dominguez (2020).

A book about beekeeping, bees, bravery, and the sweet-honey-reward of overcoming a fear.

 

The Red Tree by Shaun Tan (2003).

This is in all honesty my favorite picture book ever and has been since I first discovered it. A picture book that explores what it’s like when the world seems upside-down, when you feel lost and disoriented and down. A book that, even in the middle of all that, still contains vivid hope.

I featured Shaun Tan’s Picture Book Life a few years ago if you want to check that out.

 

 

 

2 Responses to 15 picture books for comfort

  1. Andrea Mack says:

    What a lovely selection!

  2. Pingback: new picture books for now - This Picture Book Life

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