Category Archives: PICTURE BOOKS +

how to make friends with a ghost + marshmallow ghosts from Sincerely, Syl!

How to Make Friends with a Ghost by Rebecca Green (2017).

This is a dear, dear picture book. As the title implies, it contains a guide to making friends with a phantom written by Dr. Phantoneous Spookel, leading ghost expert and poet, and stars one sweet girl and one sweet companion ghost.

(click image(s) to enlarge)

The tone is at once quirky, inventive, and sincere and what gets me the most are the details. There’s a warning not to put your hand through a ghost as that can cause a tummy ache. There’s advice on hiding a ghost in a tissue box when guests come over. It’s those creative bits like bath time in a cauldron, bedtime lullabies of “eerie hums and wails,” and snack time of earwax truffles that truly delight.

The guide has three parts: ghost identification, ghost basics, and growing up with your ghost. The last one takes the main character all the way into adulthood, a certain spirit always by her side. And the ending plays with the idea of a friendship that lasts and lasts and truly goes on forever. You’ll seeeeeee!

Rebecca Green‘s illustrations have those same qualities as the text—quirky and inventive while also being sincere and gentle. This tender ghost story is a win all around.

 

Big thanks to Tundra Books/Penguin Random House Canada for images!

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Baker and cook extraordinaire, Sylvia of  Sincerely, Syl, is here with a vanilla marshmallow ghost recipe to bring the sweet ghost from the story to life!! Sylvia works for Tundra, the publisher of How to Make Friends with a Ghost, and we’ve been wanting to collaborate for some time. And then we found the perfect fall book, and Sylvia devised the perfect craft, complete with the ghost’s small mouth (that eats a lot) and rosy cheeks. Plus, each ghost is satisfyingly squishy!!

 

Vanilla Marshmallows
Makes enough to fill an 8 x 12 x 2 baking pan

½ cup water
3 envelopes unflavored gelatin
Unsalted butter, melted
2 cups granulated sugar
½ cup golden corn syrup
½ teaspoon salt
½ cup water
2 tablespoons vanilla extract
Icing sugar

  1. Using the bowl from your stand mixer, pour in the water and gelatin. Let it sit so that the gelatin can bloom.
  2. Brush the melted butter onto the base and side of your baking pan. Set it aside.
  3. Add the sugar, corn syrup, salt, and the other half cup of water into a medium saucepan over high heat. Bring it to a rolling boil and let it boil for about a minute. Then remove it from the heat.
  4. Fit your stand mixer with the whisk attachment and turn it on low to mix the water and gelatin that’s already in the bowl until it combines. Then very slowly and carefully, add the hot sugar and corn syrup mixture into the bowl.
  5. Still mixing on low, add the vanilla extract.
  6. When everything is in the bowl, turn the mixer to high and whisk for 10 minutes until the batter turns white and triples in size.
  7. Stop the mixer, using a spatula, scrape the marshmallow batter into the baking pan. Spread the batter evenly and do your best to level it. A bench scraper or off-set spatula can help.
  8. Cover the pan with aluminum foil, be sure not to touch the batter otherwise it’ll stick. Or use a lid if your baking pan comes with one. Leave the marshmallow to set at room temperature overnight or in the fridge.
  9. The next day, take the foil off and sprinkle icing sugar over the top. Cover the surface evenly so that it won’t be too sticky to handle. Run a knife along the edge of the pan to help loosen the marshmallow slab. Then carefully flip the marshmallow out onto a counter. Sprinkle icing sugar all over the marshmallow – don’t forget the sides.
  10. Use a knife to cut them into squares or roll a cookie cutter in icing sugar before using it on the marshmallow.

 

 

 

Check out that squishy sweetness!

 

And more creations are over at Sincerely, Syl. Thank you so much for making these most delightful marshmallow ghosts, Sylvia! (Here’s her post with lots of photos!)

 

 

Sylvia Chan lives in Toronto, Ontario with a growing collection of books and kitchen supplies. During the day, she works in marketing and publicity for a children’s publishing house. On her time off, Sylvia loves to bake, eat, photograph, draw, and travel. Follow along at sincerely.syl on Instagram or visit her blog at www.sincerelysyl.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Interview: The Conscious Kid Book Delivery Service

Today I’m pleased to interview Katie of The Conscious Kid Subscription Box here on This Picture Book Life. Conscious Kid delivers diverse books to kids each month in a library-style service—return the books and get a new batch each month! Plus, their selections are chosen to “reduce bias & promote positive identity development” in youth—an intentional, important mission indeed.

This Picture Book Life: What prompted you to start The Conscious Kid? Please tell us about your journey.

Katie: My partner and I started The Conscious Kid to address two issues: access to diverse representation in children’s literature and bias. Our sons are two and four and it is very important for us to be intentional about surrounding them with narratives and images that center, affirm and celebrate their identities. When I went to our nearest public library to request every children’s book they had featuring Black characters, the librarian came back with a list of three. Out of the thousands of children’s books they had, they only had three featuring Black people–and one depicted a woman praying for her daughter not to have “nappy” hair. Even though it ostensibly checked the box for “representation,” it was not the type of representation or messaging we wanted for our kids. Every library is different, but we knew we weren’t the only ones having this issue at some level.

Creating The Conscious Kid was about making it easy for parents like us to have convenient access to diverse children’s books that not only reflect underrepresented kids, but center and empower their identities.

Our other primary focus is bias. Implicit and explicit bias starts young. Research from Harvard University suggests that children as young as three years old, when exposed to racism and prejudice, tend to embrace and accept it. Children express pro-white/anti-Black bias at this same age; and by age five, are strongly biased towards whiteness. Developmental psychologists have argued that the time for change and intervention is in early childhood, when bias is flexible and only just emerging. Children’s books are a very practical way to initiate conversations on race and oppression, and encourage kids to think critically about these issues.

Research has shown that engaging in open, honest and frequent conversations about racial inequality is associated with lower levels of bias in children. In addition, indirect contact with diverse groups through books has been shown to improve attitudes and behavioral intentions towards oppressed groups. For example, children who read books featuring cross-racial friendships report greater comfort and interest in playing with children of different races than those who do not, and these attitude changes persist over time. Stories have been shared in every culture as a means of education and can be used as tools to challenge racism, sexism, and classism (Solorzano & Yosso, 2002). Our library uses counter-stories to challenge deficit-based narratives and narratives where marginalized voices are erased.

TPBL: As I understand it, your subscription box is a lending library. How does it work and what made you choose this particular set up?

Katie: We are a custom-curated delivery service for diverse children’s books. Families, community organizations, and educators subscribe to the library and three new diverse books are shipped directly to their home or classroom on the 1st of each month. The books are shipped with a postage-paid return envelope that is used to mail the books back to us the following month. Subscriptions are for three, six or twelve months, and book selections are customized based on the age (0-18) of the subscribers and any special requests (i.e. books that counter Islamophobia, books with strong female of color protagonists, books presenting families with same-sex parents, etc.). Each book goes through a comprehensive anti-bias screening process before it gets included into our inventory and we prioritize #OwnVoices books that are authored by members of the communities being reflected.

We chose a book rental model because there was no one else delivering diverse children’s books in such a low-cost way. The cost of the subscription is equivalent to the actual cost of shipping the books back and forth. Starting in October, subscribers will have the option to purchase any or all of the titles they receive each month.

Our service is aimed at those who may have barriers to accessing a public library or whose library or local bookstore may not (yet) have the representation they are looking for. While there is growing recognition of the importance and value of diverse children’s books, access and availability remains a challenge. Although some libraries and bookstores have a more diverse selection than others, it can still be a very time-intensive process for parents or educators to locate and select diverse books that do not contain harmful stereotypes or messaging. We spend a significant amount of time advocating for schools and libraries around the country to center more diverse books, so are constantly working towards (and hoping for) a future where there won’t be a need for us anymore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TPBL: What are three recent picture books that fit with The Conscious Kid mission? Tell us a little about why you like each one.

Katie:

Yo Soy Muslim by Mark Gonzales, Illustrated by Mehrdokht Amini.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations released a report finding anti-Muslim incidents in the United States are up 91% so far in 2017 over the same period last year. Yo Soy Muslim, which translates to “I am Muslim”, is an affirmation to young Muslim-American children growing up in a social context of Islamophobia and xenophobia. This book is a declaration of self and lovingly depicts a father’s journey to support his daughter in finding joy and pride in all aspects of her Muslim, Latina, Tunisian, and American identity. Ages 4-8.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mamas’ Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation by Edwidge Danticat, Illustrated by Leslie Staub.

 Mama’s Nightingale is the story of an undocumented Haitian mother who is placed in a immigration detention center and separated from her young daughter. Over 16 million people in the US live in “mixed-status” families, in which at least one family member is a noncitizen, whether a green card holder or an undocumented immigrant. A 2013 report found that 150,000 children had been separated from one or both parents as a result of US immigration policies. This book humanizes this issue by showing the impact from the perspective of a child, and exemplifies how young people can use their voices to speak out and advocate for change. Ages 5-8.

 

 

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A Lion’s Mane by Navjot Kaur, illustrated by Jaspreet Sandhu.

Since 9/11, Sikh Americans have become the targets of hate crimes because of their turbans and beards. Islamophobia impacts Sikhs because people assume that Sikhs are Muslims. Sikh author Navjot Kaur wrote this book on the Sikh dastaar (or turban) and explains: “My son’s Sikh identity would be a constant and so would his Deaf identity. The written words rooted a desire for my son – that he should never feel afraid to stand out and be different. My book leads a way forward for any child wondering about personal identity. All children want to see themselves represented in the books they read. A Lion’s Mane takes young readers on a journey to cultures around the world to explore the meaning of the dastaar and help promote our connections as global citizens. This book provides much needed Sikh representation in children’s literature and awareness of the sacred significance of the dastaar. Ages 6-11.

 

 

Thank you, Katie, for stopping by and for your good work putting books in the hands of kids!

Katie Ishizuka is a researcher, activist and social worker with a decade of experience working with youth and adults of color involved in the criminal justice system and advocating for community-based alternatives to incarceration. She is published author on Anti-Oppressive Practice for Oxford University Press (2015) and the School-to-Prison Pipeline for the Justice Policy Institute (2013). Katie has her Master of Social Work from Howard University.

Ramon Stephens is a PhD student in Education at the University of California at San Diego, and has his Master of Education from California State University at Long Beach. A long-time proponent of student voice, retention and resilience for marginalized youth, Ramon has developed & run student-driven, culturally-relevant curriculums & after-school programs for students of color in D.C. Public Schools, Long Beach Unified, San Diego Unified and U.C. San Diego.

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20 terrific and true picture books

I learn so much from reading non-fiction picture books, and of course I’m sure kids do too! They give insight into historical figures and events, into the way people have solved problems and overcome incredible odds to follow a dream or to fight for justice, into the way dreamers and doers are formed.

With a new school year having started, I couldn’t help but think about a list of some recent favorites— standouts and truly terrific true stories.  Here goes!

 

Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat by Javaka Steptoe.

Terrific. Incredible. All the adjectives for this biography of Basquiat. “Art is the street games of little children, in our style and the words that we speak. It is how the messy patchwork of the city creates new meaning for ordinary things.”

 


Freedom in Congo Square by Carole Boston Weatherford and R. Gregory Christie.

Congo Square was the only place enslaved (and free) Africans were allowed to meet together in New Orleans in the 1800s, a place where they played music, danced, and shared news. It embodied the hope of freedom and both the succinct, powerful prose and evocative illustrations truly capture that.

 

 

I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark written by Debbie Levy, illustrations by Elizabeth Baddeley.

A boldly designed picture book about a bold person whose journey started at the library!

 

 

 

 

Whoosh!: Lonnie Johnson’s Super-Soaking Stream of Inventions by Chris Barton, illustrated by Don Tate.

This is truly a terrific book about an ingenious inventor. “…Because facing challenges, solving problems, and building things are what Lonnie Johnson loves to do. And his ideas just keep on flowing.”

 

 

 

Separate is Never Equal by Duncan Tonatiuh.

Another excellent book, this one documenting the case of Mendez vs. Westminster School District—Sylvia Mendez and her family’s fight to desegregate schools in California. Plus, I’m a big fan of Duncan Tonatiuh’s artwork (stay tuned!).

 

 

 

Crossing Bok Chito: A Choctaw Tale of Friendship & Freedom by Tim Tingle, illustrated by Jeanne Rorex Bridges.

An emotional story with stunning artwork of a Choctaw girl in the 1800s who befriends a little boy who’s a slave and then her family helps his escape to freedom.

 

 

Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music by Margarita Engle and Rafael López.

This one is inspired by the true story of Millo Castro Zaldarriaga who dreamed of drumming in Cuba despite gender restrictions and eventually had an all girls band with her sisters and became a famous musician. The dreamiest text and illustrations.

 

 

 


Wangari Masthai: The Woman Who Planted Millions of Trees by Frank Prévot, illustrated by Aurélia Fronty.

A breathtakingly beautiful book that tells of Wangari Maathai’s early life and obstacles in her reforestation work. “…a tree is worth more than its wood.”

 

 

 

Take a Picture of Me, James Van der Zee by Andrea Loney, illustrated by Keith Mallett.

A wonderful exploration of the life of photographer James Van Der Zee and the Harlem Renaissance as well as the way history shapes lives and lives shape history.

 

 

The Wolves of Currumpaw by William Grill.

A gripping tale of a legendary wolf and a man who had the capacity for change. A book for budding conservationists.

 

 


Her Right Foot by Dave Eggers, art by Shawn Harris.

With the Statue of Liberty as its subject, this one contains facts and laughs and cries and an important message about making the U.S. a welcoming place.

 

 

 

The Book Itch by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie.

Terrific in every way, this story of the National Memorial African Bookstore is also illustrated by a frequent appearer on this list—the talented R. Gregory Christie.

 

 

 

Are You an Echo?: The Lost Poetry of Misuzu Kaneko by David Jacobson, Sally Ito, and Michiko Tsuboi, illustrated by Toshikado Hajiri.

This is a poignant biography of a Japanese poet, followed by her poems. A wonderful (and honest) book.

 

 


A Time to Act: John F. Kennedy’s Big Speech by Shana Corey and R. Gregory Christie.

This is a fairly comprehensive biography of JFK given the short format and young audience. His childhood, his political rise, and his delay and then eventual speech and action on civil rights. It begins and ends with inspiration for young people, the readers of the book “to speak up, to act, to move the world forward—to make history.”

 

 

 

Tiny Stitches: The Life of Medical Pioneer Vivien Thomas by Gwendolyn Hooks, illustrated by Colin Bootman.

A story everyone should know about Vivien Thomas, a research assistant who developed a procedure to give children open heart surgery in the 1940s, but who was not credited because he was African American. This book recognizes his struggles and celebrates his contribution, as we should.

 

 

 

 

Cloth Lullaby: The Woven Life of Louise Bourgeois, words by Amy Novensky, pictures by Isabelle Arsenault.

A biography of the artist, Louise Bourgeois, whose life was like a cloth lullaby, woven together with the threads of her childhood, her mother, their family tapestry business, Parisian fabrics, memory, and stitching itself.

 

 

Emmanuel’s Dream: The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah by Laurie Ann Thompson & Sean Qualls.

The story of a boy born with one leg who biked close to 400 miles when no one believed he could.

 

 

Firebird by Misty Copeland and Christopher Myers.

A gorgeous book told in second person as a kind of letter of encouragement to a young girl to follow her dreams, filled with fiery, vibrant illustrations.

 

 

Swan: The Life and Dance of Anna Pavlova by Laurel Snyder, illustrated by Julie Morstad.

Another special book about dance and finding your passion, pursuing it despite obstacles and through practice, and sharing its joy with others. You can read my interview with the author here.

 

 

 

 

Grace Hopper:  Queen of Computer Code written by Laurie, Hallmark, illustrated by Katy Wu.

An amazing biography of a woman who from a young age was a creative whiz at figuring out how things work and solving problems. When she grew up, she used her skills to transform computer programming and also coin the term “computer bug.”

 

 

You might be interested in another post: Knock Your Socks Off Non-fiction Picture Books about the Natural World.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 years of this picture book life giveaway!

I want to celebrate four years of This Picture Book Life by giving away picture books! (Of course!)

I receive a lot of wonderful review copies in a year from generous publishers, so I want to share some of them with you.

There will be FOUR winners of a pair of picture books on a theme!

And there will be one winner of FOUR titles I really liked!

Away we go!

A pair of books about children around the world:

The Barefoot Book of Children by Tessa Strickland, Kate DePalama, and David Dean (2016) &

This Is How We Do It  by Matt Lamothe (2017).

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

A pair of books with super surprise endings:

Polar Bear’s Underwear by tupera tupera (2015) &

Don’t Wake Up the Tiger  by Britta Teckentrup (2016).

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

A pair of two of my favorite picture books of 2017:

Love Is  by Diane Adams, illustrated by Claire Keane (2017) &

Professional Crocodile   by Giovanna Zoboli and Mariachiara Di Giorgio (coming August 2017).

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

A pair of playful picture books:

Play With Me by Michelle Lee (2017) &

It’s Great Being a Dad  by Dan Bar-el, illustrated by Gina Perry.

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

 

BONUS GIVEAWAY: four wonderful picture books!!

Adrift at Sea by Marsha Forchuk Dkrypuch with Tuan Ho, art by Brian Deines (2016).

The Girl Who Ran by Frances Polette and Kristina Yee, illustrated by Susanna Chapman (2017).

I Know Numbers! by Taro Gomi (September, 2017).

Lily’s Cat Mask  by Julie Fortenberry (2017).

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Cheers to another year of picture books!

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COVER REVEAL! INKY’S GREAT ESCAPE + GIVEAWAY

Casey Lyall is the author of the wonderfully narrated middle grade detective novel, Howard Wallace, P.I. And her first picture book is coming out November 7th, 2017: Inky’s Great Escape. It’s illustrated by Sebastià Serra, and I’m delighted to be able to share the cover with you today!

“Based on a true story, this tale follows a daring, Houdini-esque octopus as he performs his greatest escape act yet.”

“In April 2016, The New York Times published an article about an octopus named Inky who escaped from the National Aquarium of New Zealand through a drainpipe and into the sea. In this charming fictionalized account, Inky, worn out from his exciting life in the ocean, has retired to the aquarium. There he quietly plays cards, makes faces at the visitors, and regales his tankmate Blotchy with tales of his past adventures. Then Blotchy dares Inky to make one more great escape: out of their tank. Will Inky succeed?”

 

 

Here’s the colorful, dynamic cover! (I especially like the block print quality of the title and sea surroundings and the energy that seems to emanate to and from Inky.)

 

  In honor of the cover reveal, Casey and Sebastià did a little Q & A about the design of the octopus characters:

“Sebastià, how did you come up with the design for the characters of Inky and Blotchy?”

Sebastià: The first sketches show a more naturalized version of Inky and Blotchy, with the head back like it is in a true octopus. I knew this wouldn’t be the final version because the characters were really fun and lovely and, bit by bit, the curves softened, the eyes grew and moved up the head, and the head gained importance in relation to the tentacles. All these changes were made with the intent of getting a more expressive face because this was a main point in Casey’s text – full of expressive nuances in the characters. Really it was a surprise for me to discover how expressive an octopus can be.

“Casey, what was your first reaction when you saw the artwork for Inky’s Great Escape?”
Casey: Total and utter delight! When I work on characters, I think more about the voice – how they think and talk so I really had no preconceived notions about how Blotchy and Inky would look. And I’m so glad I didn’t because what Sebastià came up with was better than anything I could have imagined. First of all, I loved the colours – everything was so bright and vibrant. But Inky and Blotchy are my favourite part because I think Sebastià captured them perfectly. The different facial expressions and body language are all spot on and totally in sync with the text. He brought them to life in the best way possible. 
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Casey is giving away one copy of Inky’s Great Escape! Since it’s not out yet, this will be a pre-order, shipping in November. Something to look forward to!

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