picture book gems a bookseller recommends: bunnie from Brave + Kind

I believe I met Bunnie from Brave + Kind Bookshop through Instagram. She was so generously supportive of my novel and when I found out she was starting her very own independent bookstore in Decatur, Georgia, I wanted to support her wonderful endeavor.

 

 

In addition to books and nooks, the neighborhood shop has really cool camps and workshops for kids (poetry, reading and creative writing, Spanish immersion) as well as a subscription service.

I cannot wait to visit in person someday, and I hope you do too!

Big thanks to Bunnie for sharing six picture book recommendations! Over to her!

 

 

 

 

I was at a point in my life where I wanted to turn a literal next chapter. A fit for my life and family. Something that would leave a lasting impact. I’d like to say I was not heavily influenced by Meg Ryan in You’ve Got Mail (1995), but it certainly planted a seed all those years ago.

So here am I now with my own little neighborhood shop around the corner. I’m grateful to get to curate a fun selection of kids books that I hope will inspire them to do something Brave, to do something Kind. It certainly makes me feel Brave and Kind to be a part of that.

As I look around the bookshop to finish writing I realize I have almost none of the books from below on the shelves currently because I can’t stop recommending them to our friends at Brave—HA!

 

 

I Had a Favorite Dress by Boni Ashburn, illustrated by Julia Denos (2011).

“Snip snip, sew sew, new shirt—hello!”

I love this book first because the illustrations are just so darn sweet. And the beautiful chocolate girl on the cover just melts me. My first born (of two) is a girl, Andie and we have had our share of favorite dresses.  It’s a story about a girl who outgrows her favorite dress but finds a way (with the help of her creative and patient mama) to keep wearing it in different iterations. The story is centered and illustrated around days of the week and seasons and its sing-song nature spins a fun and loving tale of getting older, creating memories, and adjusting to change.

 

 

 

 

 

One by Kathryn Otoshi (2008).

“But One stood up straight like an arrow and said, NO.”

 

I read this to my son’s (Avery) 1st grade class and they got so into it. They couldn’t  wait for me to read the next page! Its use of primary and secondary colors and numbers as characters proves a unique and fresh spin in this story about bullies and standing up for yourself and others. Blue is quiet, and Red is a hothead. One is about friendship and bravery and kindness and a staple on the shelves at Brave + Kind.

 

 

 

The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by Rafael López (2018).

“Rigoberto. From Venezuela, your teacher says so soft and beautifully that your name and homeland sound like flowers blooming the first bright notes of a song.”

I’m partial to books that have diverse representation because I believe that everyone deserves (and wants) to see themselves in the stories they read (and watch too).  We want to know that who we are and what we have to share with the world is good and enough. Even though we may look different on the outside with things like skin color, the things we eat or like to play, we are more alike than we know. This book’s cast of children is grappling with too poor, too shy, too different, or are they? The story celebrates bravery and stepping out to share your story even when you feel like an outsider. And what you may pleasantly find  when you do.

 

 

 

How to Be A Lion by Ed Verde (2018).

“They say, a lion can’t be gentle.”

This is an inspiring and courageous story of Leonard (a lion) and his best pal Marianne (a duck) and how these unlikely friends conspire to show those who insist that a lion and a duck should not be friends, that there are many ways to be a lion and many ways to be a friend. Timely and charming, this story will open young readers’ eyes to the importance of trusting their intuition and how choosing kindness in the face of criticism might just change the world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Girl by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Paris Rosenthal, illustrated by Holly Hatam (2017).

“Dear Girl, Keep that arm raised. You have smart things to say.”

 

Oh my gosh I really think all the girls should have a copy of this and women too.  Each page is a manifesto for all young girls as they consider what it means to trust and just be themselves. And that they are beyond amazing, just as they are.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rumple Buttercup: A Story of Bananas, Belonging, and Being Yourself by Matthews Gray Gubler (2019).

“For All the Rumples Everywhere.”

Let me start by saying, I was sobbing by the end of this story. Think, what every single one of us wants is to belong and feel loved and connected. And I believe that our differences are what actually bind us together. Rumple is really weird. One of his eyeballs is literally floating in mid-air the entire book. And his teeth are crooked and skin is green. But if we really think about it, we all have something about ourselves that we feel is weird. (I haven’t always had a gap in my front teeth but I’m starting to like it, I think.) I don’t want to spoil it if you haven’t read it yet, but there’s an imaginary friend made of old candy and spaghetti and at some point Rumple thinks it’s a great idea to wear a banana on his head to blend in. Its beautifully quirky illustrated pages coupled with its inspiring and important message make this the perfect gift for anyone at all including yourself.

 

 

 

 

 

Bunnie Hilliard lives in Decatur, Georgia with her Hubby, Two kids Andie and Avery, and dog Brodie. She’s a stay at home mom (with a few side hustles) turned newest shop girl on the block (7 months and counting). When she grows up she wants to be brave and kind.

Find Brave + Kind on Instagram and Facebook. Check out their cute t-shirts for kids too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Response to picture book gems a bookseller recommends: bunnie from Brave + Kind

  1. Congrats on opening your indie! I love the name of your store (definitely something for everyone to aspire to), and know that you will make a difference in so many lives! AND I love so many of the books you’ve listed here. But I haven’t heard of Rumple Buttercup. Putting it on my TBR list. Thanks for the recs and best of luck with the store and your programming!

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