Search Results for: picture book gems

picture book gems a bookseller recommends—translations edition

Hannah is a children’s bookseller who once stopped by to give us 5 elements of a successful storytime, evidenced by 5 picture books. Now she’s back as part of my picture book gems a bookseller/librarian recommends series! And this is a treat because she’s chosen international picture book translations.

Over to Hannah!

 

I have always loved learning languages. As a kid, I studied Spanish in school, and as an international affairs major in college, I studied Arabic, Hindi, and Farsi. Each language has a particular nuance, reflecting unique cultures and histories–when translated, the best stories do not lose any of that uniqueness. I’m drawn to translated children’s books in particular because I believe they offer a window to the world to kids that an atlas or a nonfiction book cannot–reading a translated book gives a child a bridge across the globe, connecting the reader to a different way of thinking and imagining. The following are six of my current translated favorites from around the world.

 

 

Seven Pablos by Jorge Luján, translated from the Spanish by Mara Lethem, illustrated by Chiara Carrer.

“There are many Pablos in the world, yet they are all one. Inside each of them is a heart that beats to the same rhythm as the ocean’s waves and the rotations of the planet.”

I wish that line from Seven Pablos could be written everywhere and understood by those at the highest levels of power. This is a book that meditates on the universal human experiences of children around the world, touching on issues like migration, poverty, and bullying. It is a necessary book for the time we live in–one of those Pablos could very well be one of the 12,800 detained children at the United States border.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Valley by Claude Ponti, translated from the French by Alyson Waters.

I’m a huge fan of weird, cozy, imagined worlds–the Moomin series is my absolute favorite–so this one appealed to me right off the bat. Its giant trim size is difficult to shelve, but it’s so necessary for spying all the minute details of the Twims’ world. These cute, squirrel-like beings live in trees with rooms that have specific purposes: a room to be born in, a room to read in, a room to swim in. With notes on their history, their mythology, and their daily lives, Ponti builds an immersive experience akin to reading a fantasy novel–making this book a delight to pore over and get lost within.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stepping Stones: A Refugee Family’s Journey by Margriet Ruurs, translated into Arabic by Falah Raheem, art by Nizar Ali Badr.

There have been many picture book explorations of the Syrian refugee experience, but this one is my absolute favorite. A true collaboration between author and artist, this bilingual story is a resonant, lyrical tale of one family’s life before and during the war and their hard journey out of Syria and into a hopeful future. Though Badr’s images are composed only from sea-smoothed stone, they are full of life and poignancy.

 

 

 

 

 

Chirri & Chirra by Kaya Doi, translated from the Japanese by Yuki Kaneko.

Never have I wanted to hug a book so much. This is a delicious and delightful ride of a book–one of those you want to step right inside and live within, featuring two adorable girls who ride their bikes through a magical world where friendly animals serve them jam sandwiches and clover blossom tea and other delicious treats. Though this book was published in 2016, its comforting, cheery atmosphere gives it the feel of a bygone classic.

 

 

 

 

Feather by Cao Wenxuan, translated from the Chinese by Chloe Garcia-Roberts, illustrated by Roger Mello.

Feather is a unique, beautiful take on the “Are You My Mother” story structure as a lost feather floats along, trying to find the bird it belongs to. Paired with Mello’s spare yet rich and dynamic illustrations, this hopeful story of searching for belonging soars above the rest. I highly recommend this one for fans of birds, folktales, and accessibly philosophical kids’ books.

 

 

 

 

 

On a Magical Do-Nothing Day by Beatrice Alemagna, translated from the French by Jill Davis

Nature can awaken even the most stodgy of imaginations. In On a Magical Do-Nothing Day, Alemagna’s bespectacled, bored child (gender is never addressed, which I LOVE) finds theirs jump-started after they drop their video game in a pond and begin to notice the wonder of the woods around them. Alemagna’s prose and illustrations sing with delicious metaphor, and her magical, mystical forest is rich in texture and detail. I dare you to read this book and not want to immediately go traipsing through the woods, finding your own magic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hannah lives in Athens, GA, where she works as the manager of children’s books at Avid Bookshop. She often daydreams about living a calm and peaceful life in Moominvalley or traipsing the Maine coast with Miss Rumphius. A librarian at heart (and in training), Hannah loves the look on a kid’s face when they find a book they truly love.

 

picture book gems a librarian recommends: alia from read it real good

I’m thrilled to have Alia from Read it Real Good here to share picture book gems she recommends as a librarian, former bookseller, and blogger! You can learn more about her here and check out her list of resources on diverse children’s literature from her blog as well. Get ready to go to the bookstore or have your library card ready because she’s sharing some of her favorite recent and backlist picture books with us!

 

Over to Alia!

 

 

 Black Girl Magic by Mahogany L. Browne/Jess X. Snow

 

This illustrated poem begins with “This book is for you.” And yes it is. It is unabashedly black, young and full of truth and positive affirmations for young black women. Perfect for ages 7 – tween, Black Girl Magic is raw and honest. Snow’s illustrations beautifully accompany Browne’s powerful poetry. Yes, black girls, you are magic. You are strong and let NO ONE tell you any different.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where’s Halmoni? by Julie Kim

 

It’s hard to believe that this is Julie Kim’s debut picture book. Well, it’s more of a picture book/graphic novel hybrid. Korean-American kids Joon and his Noona (big sister) visit their grandmother’s house to find that she’s gone, the house is a mess and huge cat-prints are everywhere! >_< Kim takes readers on a journey to a land of trickster rabbits, hungry goblins and angry tigers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 El Primer Corte de Mesita de Furqan – Furqan’s First Flat Top by Robert Liu-Trujillo & translated by Cinthya Muñoz

Ten year old Furqan takes a trip to the barbershop for his first cut. He wants to try a new flat top for his thick, curly hair, but he’s a little scared of change. His dad lovingly reassures him that his hair is gonna come out fresh, no matter what. We get a peek into Furqan’s daily life. This bilingual story features loving parents and a supportive community. Liu-Trujillo’s watercolor & ink illustrations portray so much joy and love.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Up! How Families Around the World Carry Their Little Ones  by Susan Hughes/Ashley Barron

 

I love picture books that use non-traditional mediums like paper, cloth, string, etc. Barron’s illustrations for Up! are gorgeous and unique. They invite you to stare at them for long moments. We learn a bit about how different people around the world carry & transport their little ones. I love the inclusiveness of the illustrations and the bouncy rhythm of the text.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All Around Us  by Xelena González/Adriana M. Garcia

 

It’s special whenever our elders share knowledge with us; it’s something not to be taken for granted. All Around Us is about a little girl and the lessons she learns from her grandfather. They have such a beautiful relationship! He teaches her about circles, continuity and how people are a part of the earth. The illustrations are so beautifully TRIPPY. I appreciate how this book celebrates family, indigeneity and tradition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

We Are Brothers by Yves Nadon/Jean Claverie

 

Black brotherly love. Strength. Growing up. This quiet picture book explores the relationship between two brothers and how love, support and encouragement are so important. Climbing up and jumping off the top of a cliff into a lake sure is scary but…you’ll never know how much fun it is until you try. I love the soft illustrations in this book and the scenes of transformation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Backlist Favorites:

 

Where Do We Go When We Disappear?  by Isabel Minhós Martins/Madalena Matoso

 

This is a reflective and thought-provoking picture book about death, loss, or the simple act of someone/something being gone. When I was a bookseller, it was hard to find good books to give to parents to help their kids grieve. This is a great one because it helps begin a discussion about CHANGE. Matoso’s illustrations are bold and colorful and Martins is such a thoughtful writer.

 

 

 

 

 

Sidewalk Flowers by JonArno Lawson/Sydney Smith

 

A young girl and her father take a walk through their neighborhood. Though he’s on his phone for most of the journey, he is present. He is there. She’s on a mission to find flowers and share them as gifts. Smith’s use of color is exquisite in this wordless picture book. We see color when we need to. We watch it bloom. We watch their love as they walk together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ten Nine Eight  by Molly Bang

 

Wow, what a throwback this one is. I remember it from my childhood. Can I tell you how special it is to see a little black girl sitting with her daddy, eyes sleepy, getting ready for bed? With its soft, warm illustrations, this book reminds me of the love I shared with my father. Ten, Nine, Eight is a counting book that also celebrates Black Family. It’s also available as a board book! How perfect. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alia Jones is a Sr. Library Services Assistant with The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. She is also a former indie children’s bookseller and English teacher in South Korea. She blogs about diverse books & children’s literature at www.readitrealgood.com. You can also follow her on Twitter @readitrealgood. Alia believes that we are truly in a Picture Book Renaissance; there is so much talent out there.

 

 

 

 

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picture book gems a bookseller recommends: sally from the curious reader

I’m so happy to have Sally from The Curious Reader children’s bookstore in New Jersey here to share some picture book gems she recommends! Sally has wonderful taste in books and her store’s Instagram account is a must follow for the kidlit community!

 

 

Over to Sally!

 

 

2017 FAVORITES:

WOLF IN THE SNOW BY MATTHEW CORDELL

My first 2017 love. This tale of kindness repaid is perfect in all the right ways: well-paced, beautifully illustrated, and emotionally rich, despite the only words in the whole thing being sounds. I’m hoping this one gets all the recognition it deserves at awards time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALFIE: THE TURTLE THAT DISAPPEARED BY THYRA HEDER

Thyra Heder has only written and illustrated three books, and each one puts a unique twist on traditional picture book storytelling. Her new one is a tender love story between a girl and her pet turtle and is told from each one’s point of view. The pictures are gorgeous and filled with detail, and the inventive structure doesn’t diminish the story’s emotional impact – if anything, its power is enhanced by the two different perspectives. Plus, an absolutely perfect surprise ending.

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROFESSIONAL CROCODILE BY GIOVANNA ZOBOLI & MARIACHIARA DI GIORGIO

This one is another top book from this year. The lovely, witty illustrations are worth lingering over, and the build up to the revelation of this city-dwelling croc’s job is masterfully executed. Told mostly in panels, there are a couple of double-page spreads that are breathtaking, and like most wordless books, it just gets better with each read.

 

 

 

 

STILL STUCK BY SHINSUKE YOSHITAKE

I have a theory that one of the most difficult things to pull off successfully is producing content that will make both children and adults laugh – The Muppets, Sandra Boynton, and Mo Willems are all experts at walking this fine line. This Japanese import manages to be hilarious to all ages; a perfect, simple idea, executed with deadpan brilliance. A little boy gets stuck trying to take his shirt off and, after struggling for a bit, gives up and imagines what life would be like with the shirt stuck forever.

 

 

 

 

BACKLIST FAVORITES:

AMANDINA BY SERGIO RUZZIER

One of my least favorite types of kids’ books are the ones that totally forfeit charm and storytelling for a blandly presented be yourself!!!!! message. Ugh. It’s not giving kids enough credit, and is a terrific way to get them to hate books. That’s why books like this one are so great: it’s quirky and well-written and has a really neat Italian feel, PLUS it’s got a bunch of good messages about practice and hard work and staying true to oneself mixed in. Also, Amandina Goldeneyes is just a terrific name.

 

 

 

 

 

TALES FROM OUTER SUBURBIA BY SHAUN TAN

I believe there is no artistic style that Shaun Tan could not master, and on top of that, he’s a super thoughtful guy with a brilliant, weird imagination. Pretty much all his books are perfect, but this one’s a tiny bit more so. Fifteen odd stories, beautifully and inventively told, some quite powerful, all remarkable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KUMA-KUMA CHAN, THE LITTLE BEAR BY KAZUE TAKAHASHI

Everyone should own this book, this tiny little jewel. The narrator imagines what his friend, Kuma-Kuma Chan, does during the day: “He trims the nails of his paws. Then he lines up the cut nails and gazes at them. He lies on his roof and just looks at clouds floating by. He lies on the floor and listens to the sound of rain falling on the roof.” This book will always make me feel at least 30% better, so I keep it right next to my desk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIG PLANS BY BOB SHEA AND LANE SMITH

One of the top five funniest picture books I’ve ever read (Kid Sheriff and the Terrible Toads by the same team is also top five), and the book that made me love Bob Shea. A little boy imagines how he’ll take over the world, in a glorious outline of his “BIG PLANS! BIG PLANS, I SAY!” Unfortunately out of print, this is a book worth tracking down from the library – I guarantee you’ll be quoting it immediately after.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sally Morgan has been a children’s bookseller for over twelve years, and in 2013 she and her father opened The Curious Reader, a unique children’s bookstore, in Glen Rock, NJ. She tries to read at least one picture book a day.

Instagram: @thecuriousreader

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can see my previous post with another bookseller’s children’s book recommendations—Jen from Vroman’s in Pasadena, California, too!

 

 

 

10 picture book gems a bookseller recommends: jen from vroman’s

I have a treat for you today. Jen Pino from Vroman’s Bookstore in Pasadena, California has ten picture book gems she recommends! Jen is a passionate bookseller and a delightful person, and I thought it would be neat to find out what picture books are on her radar right now, and have her pass them along to you!

 

Over to Jen!

 

The World of Work by Silvie Sanža, illustrated by Milan Stary (2017).

 

I love that this book features ALL TYPES of jobs. When you are little, I feel like you only get exposed to the jobs your parents do, firefighters, doctors, police, and teachers. This book has so many more. This includes working for the Mountain Rescue Service, being an Operational Planner or even….a Bookseller!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Things Are Made by Olderich Reueziecka, illustrated by Alexandra Hetmerovaa (2016).

This is another amazing non-fiction title! Each page features a different way an object is made. Some examples are: a spoon, bread, and a t-shirt! The pages have basic summaries at first, then you can lift the flaps to get even more details!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Word From Sophia by Jim Averbeck and Yasmeed Ismail (2015).

This book is charming. I instantly fell in love with Sophia and her quest to own a giraffe. Several family members stand in the way of her desire, but Sophia, not one to be easily dissuaded, provides multiple arguments, complete with presentations, pie charts and stellar vocabulary, as she makes her case. Colorful, engaging pictures enhance the book’s delight. Additionally, this book serves as a tremendous resource of SAT worthy vocabulary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

That Neighbor Kid by Daniel Miyares (2017).

Daniel Miyares has been one of my favorite illustrators for a while. Whenever he has something new coming out, I am eager to see what it’s going to be. In this, budding curiosity turns into a beautiful friendship. When the colors on the page go from black and white to warm shades, I get chills. So so good.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Rory the Dinosaur Wants a Pet by Liz Climo (2016).

This is seriously the sweetest book and Rory is endearing as he searches for a pet to love. Liz Climo causes your heart to soar as you witness childhood imagination and innocence in its purest form.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dylan the Villain by K.G. Campbell (2016).

This is a super funny book for all the little super villains in your life. Dylan strives to be the “very best and cleverest super-villain in the whole wide world.” But will Addison Van Malice and some purple parsnip preserves stand in the way of that?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When Jackie Saved Grand Central by Natasha Wing, illustrated by Alexandra Boiger (2017).

This is another book that gives me chills each time I read it. I never knew what Grand Central had to go through to be the station it is today. Furthermore, I had no idea how much work Jackie Kennedy did, over the course of 3 years, in order to save it from being demolished. I loved learning about how much Americans cared about Grand Central and how it started a movement to save other landmarks across the states.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panda Pants by Jacqueline Davies, illustrated by Sydney Hanson ( 2016).

Baby Panda wants pants. When his father doesn’t understand why a Panda would need pants, baby Panda illustrates exactly why they would come in handy. However, even if on the surface this could be a book about choosing an outfit for the day, it’s underlying themes could be used to go even deeper. I could see Teachers and Parents using this book as a way to help children own who they are and who they want to be.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Airport Book by Lisa Brown (2016).

I was thrilled to see that this book features characters as diverse as an airport actually is. In calm, but informative text, this book narrates exactly the kinds of things a child might face when traveling to, entering an airport, or boarding a plane. Everything that a child might have a question about (regarding airports), is in this book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dragon Was Terrible by Kelly DiPucchio, pictures by Greg Pizzoli (2016).

I LOVE LOVE LOVE Kelly DiPucchio. I think everything she touches turns to gold. This book is about a terrible dragon who cannot be tamed. However, turns out our dragon has a soft side for stories! Dragon’s face cracks me up as he “pretends not to listen” to the hero and friend he could be. This is for troublemakers and softies alike.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jen Pino works at the oldest and largest independent bookstore in Southern California, Vroman’s Bookstore. She’s worked there for almost 7 years and loves all things related to children’s books. Check out her blog: Confessions of a Starstruck Bookseller, where she shares what’s new at Vroman’s Bookstore, reviews books, features gift guides, and showcases booksellers!

 

 

 

Thank you, Jen, for sharing these picture book gems with us! 

 

 

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a list of picture books that capture small, still moments

I thought it would be nice to round up a list of books that capture small, still moments. Moments to pay attention to. Moments to savor.

 

All Around Us by Xelena González, illustrated by Adriana M. Garcia (2017).

Alia of Read it Real Good first brought this book to my attention in her guest post. A grandparent and grandchild see the circles—both literal and figurative—in nature and life and family against a backdrop of beautiful, noteworthy illustrations.

It captures meditative moments.

 

 

The Stuff of Stars by Marion Dane Bauer, illustrated by Ekua Holmes (2018).

A stunning book about the beginning of the universe, and the beginning of you and me.

It captures moments of stardust transforming. 

 

 

On a Magical Do-Nothing Day by Beatrice Alemagna (2017).

Without their video game, a child becomes immersed in the outside world instead. “Why hadn’t I done these things before today?” they wonder as the book affirms curiosity and play and unencumbered time. 

It captures moments of exploring the outdoors.

 

 

I Am Loved by Nikki Giovanni, illustrated by Ashley Bryan (2018).

A collection of poems by Nikki Giovanni that explore many things: social justice, pride, music, quilts, and cats. But they all exude love, for self and for others.

It captures moments of love and warmth.

 

 

Tiny, Perfect Things by M.H. Clark, illustrated by Madeline Kloepper (2018).

A child and grandparent go on a walk and discover the treasures all around them.

It captures moments of noticing.

 

 

Wild Berries by Julie Flett (2013). (See my profile of Julie Flett’s picture book life.)

A boy and his grandmother pick berries (written in English with Cree vocabulary) and thank the clearing before leaving it. Contemplative with endearing details and a recipe for blueberry jam at the back.

It captures moments of nature.

 

 

Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut by Derrick Barnes, illustrated by Gordon C. James (2018).

A beautiful, triumphant book full of the most expressive portraits throughout. It’s, as the title suggests, about getting a haircut. But it’s about much more than that too.

“It’s the look your English teacher gives you when she hands you your last test with a bright red 97 slapped on it. It’s how your mother looks at you before she calls you beautiful. Flowers are beautiful. Sunrises are beautiful. Being viewed in your mother’s eyes as someone that matters—now that’s beautiful.”

It captures moments of pride. 

 

 

You Hold Me Up by Monique Gray Smith, illustrated by Danielle Daniel (2017).

Written in both English and Plains Cree, an absolutely wonderful book embodying kindness and respect. The starting point was for “healing and Reconciliation” in response to the history of oppression of Indigenous people, particularly in regards to Residential Schools in Canada.

It captures moments of community and relationships.

 

 

The Way Home in the Night by Akiko Miyakoshi (2017). (See my profile of Akiko Miyakoshi’s picture book life.)

A walk home followed by bedtime in which a child wonders about all the neighbors’ own homes and bedtime routines.

It captures moments of empathy and imagination.

 

 

The Night Box by Louise Greig and Ashling Lindsay (2017).

A curious book about a boy who has the key to let out the night, lyrically exploring day and dark.

It captures moments of night. 

 

The Night Job by Karen Hesse, illustrated by G. Brian Karas (2018).

This is a book that makes you feel like you are right there.

It captures real, true moments of a night shift.

 

 

Up The Mountain Path by Marianne Dubuc (2018).

This sweet story guides the reader along while Mrs. Badger leads Lulu the little cat up the mountain path to Sugarloaf Peak with gentle encouragement, the right tools, and wise words.

It captures moments of sharing something you love.

 

 

A Walk in the Forest by Maria Dek (2017).

This book is an invitation to walk, to follow paths, to shout, and to look in the forest.

It captures moments of play and wonder.

 

 

The Sound of Silence by Katrina Goldsaito, illustrated by Julia Kuo (2016).

Yoshio is on a quest for silence in bustling Tokyo in this captivating story where the text and illustrations work together perfectly.

It captures moments of searching and silence.

 

 

 

H is for Haiku by Sydell Rosenberg, illustrated by Sawsan Chalabi (2018).

A joyful compendium of 26 haiku poems embodying details of New York City.

It captures moments of life lived and observed. It captures poetry.

 

 

Singing Away the Dark by Caroline Woodward, illustrated by Julie Morstad (2010).

A lullaby for coping with fears.

It captures moments of being brave.

 

 

A Different Pond by Bao Phi, illustrated by Thi Bui (2017).

A gripping story filled with descriptive imagery and glowing illustrations of a boy and his father going fishing early one morning in order to feed their family—a story of this pond and the one the boy’s father left behind.

It captures moments of family.

 

 

Twenty Yawns by Jane Smiley, illustrated by Lauren Castillo (2016).

A story of a big day followed by bedtime. A story of twenty yawns.

It captures moments of nighttime.

 

 

That Neighbor Kid by Daniel Miyares (2017).

A beautiful song of a book.

It captures moments of making a friend.