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picture book gems a bookseller recommends: bunnie from Brave + Kind

I believe I met Bunnie from Brave + Kind Bookshop through Instagram. She was so generously supportive of my novel and when I found out she was starting her very own independent bookstore in Decatur, Georgia, I wanted to support her wonderful endeavor.

 

 

In addition to books and nooks, the neighborhood shop has really cool camps and workshops for kids (poetry, reading and creative writing, Spanish immersion) as well as a subscription service.

I cannot wait to visit in person someday, and I hope you do too!

Big thanks to Bunnie for sharing six picture book recommendations! Over to her!

 

 

 

 

I was at a point in my life where I wanted to turn a literal next chapter. A fit for my life and family. Something that would leave a lasting impact. I’d like to say I was not heavily influenced by Meg Ryan in You’ve Got Mail (1995), but it certainly planted a seed all those years ago.

So here am I now with my own little neighborhood shop around the corner. I’m grateful to get to curate a fun selection of kids books that I hope will inspire them to do something Brave, to do something Kind. It certainly makes me feel Brave and Kind to be a part of that.

As I look around the bookshop to finish writing I realize I have almost none of the books from below on the shelves currently because I can’t stop recommending them to our friends at Brave—HA!

 

 

I Had a Favorite Dress by Boni Ashburn, illustrated by Julia Denos (2011).

“Snip snip, sew sew, new shirt—hello!”

I love this book first because the illustrations are just so darn sweet. And the beautiful chocolate girl on the cover just melts me. My first born (of two) is a girl, Andie and we have had our share of favorite dresses.  It’s a story about a girl who outgrows her favorite dress but finds a way (with the help of her creative and patient mama) to keep wearing it in different iterations. The story is centered and illustrated around days of the week and seasons and its sing-song nature spins a fun and loving tale of getting older, creating memories, and adjusting to change.

 

 

 

 

 

One by Kathryn Otoshi (2008).

“But One stood up straight like an arrow and said, NO.”

 

I read this to my son’s (Avery) 1st grade class and they got so into it. They couldn’t  wait for me to read the next page! Its use of primary and secondary colors and numbers as characters proves a unique and fresh spin in this story about bullies and standing up for yourself and others. Blue is quiet, and Red is a hothead. One is about friendship and bravery and kindness and a staple on the shelves at Brave + Kind.

 

 

 

The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by Rafael López (2018).

“Rigoberto. From Venezuela, your teacher says so soft and beautifully that your name and homeland sound like flowers blooming the first bright notes of a song.”

I’m partial to books that have diverse representation because I believe that everyone deserves (and wants) to see themselves in the stories they read (and watch too).  We want to know that who we are and what we have to share with the world is good and enough. Even though we may look different on the outside with things like skin color, the things we eat or like to play, we are more alike than we know. This book’s cast of children is grappling with too poor, too shy, too different, or are they? The story celebrates bravery and stepping out to share your story even when you feel like an outsider. And what you may pleasantly find  when you do.

 

 

 

How to Be A Lion by Ed Verde (2018).

“They say, a lion can’t be gentle.”

This is an inspiring and courageous story of Leonard (a lion) and his best pal Marianne (a duck) and how these unlikely friends conspire to show those who insist that a lion and a duck should not be friends, that there are many ways to be a lion and many ways to be a friend. Timely and charming, this story will open young readers’ eyes to the importance of trusting their intuition and how choosing kindness in the face of criticism might just change the world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Girl by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Paris Rosenthal, illustrated by Holly Hatam (2017).

“Dear Girl, Keep that arm raised. You have smart things to say.”

 

Oh my gosh I really think all the girls should have a copy of this and women too.  Each page is a manifesto for all young girls as they consider what it means to trust and just be themselves. And that they are beyond amazing, just as they are.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rumple Buttercup: A Story of Bananas, Belonging, and Being Yourself by Matthews Gray Gubler (2019).

“For All the Rumples Everywhere.”

Let me start by saying, I was sobbing by the end of this story. Think, what every single one of us wants is to belong and feel loved and connected. And I believe that our differences are what actually bind us together. Rumple is really weird. One of his eyeballs is literally floating in mid-air the entire book. And his teeth are crooked and skin is green. But if we really think about it, we all have something about ourselves that we feel is weird. (I haven’t always had a gap in my front teeth but I’m starting to like it, I think.) I don’t want to spoil it if you haven’t read it yet, but there’s an imaginary friend made of old candy and spaghetti and at some point Rumple thinks it’s a great idea to wear a banana on his head to blend in. Its beautifully quirky illustrated pages coupled with its inspiring and important message make this the perfect gift for anyone at all including yourself.

 

 

 

 

 

Bunnie Hilliard lives in Decatur, Georgia with her Hubby, Two kids Andie and Avery, and dog Brodie. She’s a stay at home mom (with a few side hustles) turned newest shop girl on the block (7 months and counting). When she grows up she wants to be brave and kind.

Find Brave + Kind on Instagram and Facebook. Check out their cute t-shirts for kids too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a list of picture books that capture small, still moments

I thought it would be nice to round up a list of books that capture small, still moments. Moments to pay attention to. Moments to savor.

 

All Around Us by Xelena González, illustrated by Adriana M. Garcia (2017).

Alia of Read it Real Good first brought this book to my attention in her guest post. A grandparent and grandchild see the circles—both literal and figurative—in nature and life and family against a backdrop of beautiful, noteworthy illustrations.

It captures meditative moments.

 

 

The Stuff of Stars by Marion Dane Bauer, illustrated by Ekua Holmes (2018).

A stunning book about the beginning of the universe, and the beginning of you and me.

It captures moments of stardust transforming. 

 

 

On a Magical Do-Nothing Day by Beatrice Alemagna (2017).

Without their video game, a child becomes immersed in the outside world instead. “Why hadn’t I done these things before today?” they wonder as the book affirms curiosity and play and unencumbered time. 

It captures moments of exploring the outdoors.

 

 

I Am Loved by Nikki Giovanni, illustrated by Ashley Bryan (2018).

A collection of poems by Nikki Giovanni that explore many things: social justice, pride, music, quilts, and cats. But they all exude love, for self and for others.

It captures moments of love and warmth.

 

 

Tiny, Perfect Things by M.H. Clark, illustrated by Madeline Kloepper (2018).

A child and grandparent go on a walk and discover the treasures all around them.

It captures moments of noticing.

 

 

Wild Berries by Julie Flett (2013). (See my profile of Julie Flett’s picture book life.)

A boy and his grandmother pick berries (written in English with Cree vocabulary) and thank the clearing before leaving it. Contemplative with endearing details and a recipe for blueberry jam at the back.

It captures moments of nature.

 

 

Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut by Derrick Barnes, illustrated by Gordon C. James (2018).

A beautiful, triumphant book full of the most expressive portraits throughout. It’s, as the title suggests, about getting a haircut. But it’s about much more than that too.

“It’s the look your English teacher gives you when she hands you your last test with a bright red 97 slapped on it. It’s how your mother looks at you before she calls you beautiful. Flowers are beautiful. Sunrises are beautiful. Being viewed in your mother’s eyes as someone that matters—now that’s beautiful.”

It captures moments of pride. 

 

 

You Hold Me Up by Monique Gray Smith, illustrated by Danielle Daniel (2017).

Written in both English and Plains Cree, an absolutely wonderful book embodying kindness and respect. The starting point was for “healing and Reconciliation” in response to the history of oppression of Indigenous people, particularly in regards to Residential Schools in Canada.

It captures moments of community and relationships.

 

 

The Way Home in the Night by Akiko Miyakoshi (2017). (See my profile of Akiko Miyakoshi’s picture book life.)

A walk home followed by bedtime in which a child wonders about all the neighbors’ own homes and bedtime routines.

It captures moments of empathy and imagination.

 

 

The Night Box by Louise Greig and Ashling Lindsay (2017).

A curious book about a boy who has the key to let out the night, lyrically exploring day and dark.

It captures moments of night. 

 

The Night Job by Karen Hesse, illustrated by G. Brian Karas (2018).

This is a book that makes you feel like you are right there.

It captures real, true moments of a night shift.

 

 

Up The Mountain Path by Marianne Dubuc (2018).

This sweet story guides the reader along while Mrs. Badger leads Lulu the little cat up the mountain path to Sugarloaf Peak with gentle encouragement, the right tools, and wise words.

It captures moments of sharing something you love.

 

 

A Walk in the Forest by Maria Dek (2017).

This book is an invitation to walk, to follow paths, to shout, and to look in the forest.

It captures moments of play and wonder.

 

 

The Sound of Silence by Katrina Goldsaito, illustrated by Julia Kuo (2016).

Yoshio is on a quest for silence in bustling Tokyo in this captivating story where the text and illustrations work together perfectly.

It captures moments of searching and silence.

 

 

 

H is for Haiku by Sydell Rosenberg, illustrated by Sawsan Chalabi (2018).

A joyful compendium of 26 haiku poems embodying details of New York City.

It captures moments of life lived and observed. It captures poetry.

 

 

Singing Away the Dark by Caroline Woodward, illustrated by Julie Morstad (2010).

A lullaby for coping with fears.

It captures moments of being brave.

 

 

A Different Pond by Bao Phi, illustrated by Thi Bui (2017).

A gripping story filled with descriptive imagery and glowing illustrations of a boy and his father going fishing early one morning in order to feed their family—a story of this pond and the one the boy’s father left behind.

It captures moments of family.

 

 

Twenty Yawns by Jane Smiley, illustrated by Lauren Castillo (2016).

A story of a big day followed by bedtime. A story of twenty yawns.

It captures moments of nighttime.

 

 

That Neighbor Kid by Daniel Miyares (2017).

A beautiful song of a book.

It captures moments of making a friend.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sean Qualls’s picture book life!

Today, I’m happy to dive into Sean Quall‘s picture book life! I’ve been following his career and have been a big admirer of his artwork for a long time so this is a neat chance to showcase some of his projects for kid readers and viewers.

When I think of Qualls’s work, I think of smooth yet textured layers. I think of pastels and pencil lines. I think of muted pinks and purples and blues that still pop. I think of shapes—circles and winking stars—on abstract backgrounds. Vibrant. Impacting and engaging. Dreamy. Beautiful.

 

 

Sean Qualls has illustrated 20 books for children (and I might even be missing a couple)!

He’s a painter and you can see a sampling of that work here.

He sometimes collaborates with his partner, Selina Alko. (See all of her books.) I wonder if (and hope!) they’ll keep making art for picture books together. When they make work together, Alko brings more collage into the mix.

He’s illustrated projects by Toni Morrison, Spike Lee, and Young People’s Poet Laureate, Margarita Engle.

He’s been given the Coretta Scott King Honor for Before John Was a Jazz Giant. That book, and others, have won many awards.

Many of his projects have been biographies.

One of his latest collaborations with Selina Alko, Why Am I Me? written by Paige Britt, is a new favorite book of mine.

 

“When I work, I draw inspiration from an array of influences such as movies, childhood memories, aging and decaying surfaces, folk art, black memorabilia, golden books and more.”

—Sean Qualls, from his Brooklyn Library exhibition

 

 

Before John was a Jazz Giant by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Sean Qualls (2008).

 

Phillis’s Big Test by Catherine Clinton, illustrated by Sean Qualls (2008).

 

“After getting my kids off to school, I spend some time (usually in cafes) journaling/self reflecting. I also use that time to figure out what projects to spend my time on that day/week. Green tea is my drink of choice.”

—Sean Qualls, from this interview

 

Skit-Skat Raggedy Cat by Roxan Orgill, illustrated by Sean Qualls (2010).

 

I studied at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn for about a year and a half and then dropped out. Later, I took a few continuing education classes at SVA (School of Visual Arts) but much of my training has been trial and error.

—Sean Qualls, from The Brown Bookshelf interview

 

Lullaby for a Black Mother by Langston Hughes, illustrated by Sean Qualls (2013).

 

Emmanuel’s Dream: The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah by Laurie Ann Thomspon & Sean Qualls (2015).

 

“In the late 90’s I discovered outsider and folk artists and was inspired to go for feeling in my work rather than an academic approach.”

—Sean Qualls, from this interview with M is for Movement

 

Grandad Mandela by Zindzi Mandela, Zazi Mandela, and Ziwelene Mandela, illustrated by Sean Qualls (2018).

 

The Case for Loving, written by Selina Alko, illustrated by Sean Qualls and Selina Alko (2015).

 

Why Am I Me? by Paige Britt, Sean Qualls, and Selina Alko (2017).

Two Friends by Dean Robbins, illustrated by Sean Qualls and Selina Alko (2016).

Can I Touch Your Hair?: Poems of Race, Mistakes, and Friendship by Irene Latham & Charles Waters, illustrated by Sean Qualls & Selina Alko (2018).

KidLitTV has a wonderful video featuring both Qualls and Alko. It’s a very special studio visit that shows the pair painting together while they speak about collaboration, expressing yourself, facing your fears, and more.

 

“Each time I sit down and make a piece of art…that fear comes up, that fear of not being liked or not knowing that people will accept me or the art or what I’m trying to say. But I think it’s important to keep on creating even though you may be afraid because in the end you’re only you, you’re yourself…that’s all we have is who we are and that’s all we can really share with the world…”

—Sean Qualls on Kidlit TV

 

 

 

 

You might also be interested in my last “Their Picture Book Life” installment featuring Julie Flett.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

picture book gems a bookseller recommends—translations edition

Hannah is a children’s bookseller who once stopped by to give us 5 elements of a successful storytime, evidenced by 5 picture books. Now she’s back as part of my picture book gems a bookseller/librarian recommends series! And this is a treat because she’s chosen international picture book translations.

Over to Hannah!

 

I have always loved learning languages. As a kid, I studied Spanish in school, and as an international affairs major in college, I studied Arabic, Hindi, and Farsi. Each language has a particular nuance, reflecting unique cultures and histories–when translated, the best stories do not lose any of that uniqueness. I’m drawn to translated children’s books in particular because I believe they offer a window to the world to kids that an atlas or a nonfiction book cannot–reading a translated book gives a child a bridge across the globe, connecting the reader to a different way of thinking and imagining. The following are six of my current translated favorites from around the world.

 

 

Seven Pablos by Jorge Luján, translated from the Spanish by Mara Lethem, illustrated by Chiara Carrer.

“There are many Pablos in the world, yet they are all one. Inside each of them is a heart that beats to the same rhythm as the ocean’s waves and the rotations of the planet.”

I wish that line from Seven Pablos could be written everywhere and understood by those at the highest levels of power. This is a book that meditates on the universal human experiences of children around the world, touching on issues like migration, poverty, and bullying. It is a necessary book for the time we live in–one of those Pablos could very well be one of the 12,800 detained children at the United States border.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Valley by Claude Ponti, translated from the French by Alyson Waters.

I’m a huge fan of weird, cozy, imagined worlds–the Moomin series is my absolute favorite–so this one appealed to me right off the bat. Its giant trim size is difficult to shelve, but it’s so necessary for spying all the minute details of the Twims’ world. These cute, squirrel-like beings live in trees with rooms that have specific purposes: a room to be born in, a room to read in, a room to swim in. With notes on their history, their mythology, and their daily lives, Ponti builds an immersive experience akin to reading a fantasy novel–making this book a delight to pore over and get lost within.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stepping Stones: A Refugee Family’s Journey by Margriet Ruurs, translated into Arabic by Falah Raheem, art by Nizar Ali Badr.

There have been many picture book explorations of the Syrian refugee experience, but this one is my absolute favorite. A true collaboration between author and artist, this bilingual story is a resonant, lyrical tale of one family’s life before and during the war and their hard journey out of Syria and into a hopeful future. Though Badr’s images are composed only from sea-smoothed stone, they are full of life and poignancy.

 

 

 

 

 

Chirri & Chirra by Kaya Doi, translated from the Japanese by Yuki Kaneko.

Never have I wanted to hug a book so much. This is a delicious and delightful ride of a book–one of those you want to step right inside and live within, featuring two adorable girls who ride their bikes through a magical world where friendly animals serve them jam sandwiches and clover blossom tea and other delicious treats. Though this book was published in 2016, its comforting, cheery atmosphere gives it the feel of a bygone classic.

 

 

 

 

Feather by Cao Wenxuan, translated from the Chinese by Chloe Garcia-Roberts, illustrated by Roger Mello.

Feather is a unique, beautiful take on the “Are You My Mother” story structure as a lost feather floats along, trying to find the bird it belongs to. Paired with Mello’s spare yet rich and dynamic illustrations, this hopeful story of searching for belonging soars above the rest. I highly recommend this one for fans of birds, folktales, and accessibly philosophical kids’ books.

 

 

 

 

 

On a Magical Do-Nothing Day by Beatrice Alemagna, translated from the French by Jill Davis

Nature can awaken even the most stodgy of imaginations. In On a Magical Do-Nothing Day, Alemagna’s bespectacled, bored child (gender is never addressed, which I LOVE) finds theirs jump-started after they drop their video game in a pond and begin to notice the wonder of the woods around them. Alemagna’s prose and illustrations sing with delicious metaphor, and her magical, mystical forest is rich in texture and detail. I dare you to read this book and not want to immediately go traipsing through the woods, finding your own magic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hannah lives in Athens, GA, where she works as the manager of children’s books at Avid Bookshop. She often daydreams about living a calm and peaceful life in Moominvalley or traipsing the Maine coast with Miss Rumphius. A librarian at heart (and in training), Hannah loves the look on a kid’s face when they find a book they truly love.

 

5 years of this picture book life + giveaway!

5 years! So many picture book posts!

To celebrate, I’d like to give away 5 sets of picture books on different themes.

Each one has its own Rafflecopter—enter one or two or all five! (North America only.)

 

Set #1: SUMMERTIME!

Saffron Ice Cream; The Manic Panic; Surf’s Up (board book); The Lost Picnic.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Set #2: BIOGRAPHY!

Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black HistoryPreaching to the Chickens: The Story of Young John Lewis; Miguel y su valiente caballero: El joven Cervantes sueña a don Quijote; Little Guides to Great Lives: Amelia Earhart; Dangerous Jane; A Boy and a Jaguar.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Set #3: BEING YOURSELF!

Julián Is a Mermaid; Alma and How She Got Her Name; Always Anjali.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Set #4: SCIENCE!

How to Code a Sandcastle; The Brilliant Deep; Bonkers About Beetles; Follow the Moon Home; Over and Under the Pond.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Set #5: READING, STORY, LANGUAGE, AND IMAGINATION

How to Read a Story; Nimesh the Adventurer; Read the Book, Lemmings; The Word Collector; A Child of Books.

a Rafflecopter giveaway